Elephants in Advertising - Collaterals
This page shows some of the advertising we have collected or seen where elephant imagery is used to promote something , other than elephant artifacts, in a circulating periodical such as a magazine, newspaper, newsletter or some other similar form. These periodicals are targeted at general consumer audiences in most cases but specific trades, industries, and professions in others.


Magazine Ad - Andersen Consulting
This particular sample ad ran in the company's employee publication along with a story about the ad campaign. Later, it ran in appropriate media.

This ad is pretty unique in its use of elephant attributes. It's premise is that a racing helmet and bucket seat are incompatible with the graceful slow moving giant. (Actually, elephants can move at great speed when they want to do so).

But the ad grabs attention as soon as the eye falls on it and that is the first task of any visual advertisement.



Full page full color ad ran in high readership position, inside back cover of Information Week, November 25, 1991.

The focus of this ad is fear of technological change.

This uses the image of an elephant fleeing from a mouse. The notion that elephants fear mice is widely held. What's so clever about this usage is the mouse chasing the elephant is a computer mouse which will instantly be recognized and understood by the well educated and intelligent audience to whom this publication is directed. 1991 Andersen Consulting.


Magazine Ad - CD ROM, Inc
This black and white horizontal 1/3 page magazine ad by CD ROM, Inc. uses cartoon elephant to communicate large capacity and perfect memory, two often emphasized characteristics of the elephant.

The ad ran in CD-ROM Professional magazine, Sep/Oct 1994

Magazine Ad - Pears Soap
Full page ad ran in Harper's Magazine 1884. The drawing shows a man scrubbing an elephant clean with Pears and below the caption read "The secret of the white elephant".

Magazine Ad - Cannon Towels
Full page ad ran in 1944 in unidentified publication. The illustration, which appears dated by its style, has an elephant playfully squirting water on some soldiers.

Magazine Ad - Silent Floor
Spectacular double page Magazine Print Ad for Silent Floor®

The ad ran in Southern Living magazine January 1995.

The product is an I-beam floor joist which is stronger and quieter than standard lumber joists. What better illustrates the strength of this system than a photo of it supporting an elephant's weight.

They also produced a large banner about 10 feet long for outdoor display at building material dealers who sell the product ... we have not been able to get one for our museum so far.

Below the ad is a clever photo of a cutaway room with residents and elephant at dining table supported by Silent Floor®

In May of 1998 they were back with a full color four page insert in Souther Living. Shown below.

The ads were all signed by TrusJoist MacMillan, the inventor of the beam.



Magazine Ad - Fujitsu
This full page ad for Fujitsu DynaMOTM data storage device plays on two elephant traits ... size and memory ... but uses them in contrasting directions. The headline below the picture states,

OUR MISSION WAS CLEAR. REDUCE THE SIZE. ENLARGE THE MEMORY.

On the size comparison they show the elephant and a DynaMO unit on the ground nearby. The elephant is labeled, "Loxodonta Africana, 0.14 megatons. The word megatons plays off the labelling for the DynaMO which says 128 megabytes. Very inventive ad.
©1993 Fujitsu. All Rights reserved. Our archive page does not show the publication name or date.

Magazine Ad - Hitachi
This two-page spread was captured online but we do not have the actual page. What it shows is an elephant wanting to, but unable to, cross the chasm on a thin bridge insufficient for its great weight. The text reads: "Just a reminder: You can't e-anything unless you have a strong foundation to "e" on."

Without having the full text from the page we can't adequately explain the connection to Hitachi's product but it is clear they used the elephant's massive size to make a point, and of course, to draw the eye to the page. The ad ran in Infoworld magazine January 2000.

Magazine Ad - Hewlett-Packard
Full page magazine print ad for Hewlett Packard scanners depends entirely on bicycle riding elephant for impact and attention. The headline reads, "Tiny had the hard part. Scanning it was easy."

Naming the elephant "Tiny" is an indirect play on an elephant's size. Ad ran in NADTP Journal, June 1995, page 15. (National Association of Desk Top Publishers)

Magazine Ad - Jeep
Full Page Outside Back Cover, National Geographic, October 1996

On the elephant's right rump is a small sign ... actually, a bumper sticker, which reads, "If You Can Read This Your Jeep Is Too Close".

Below the image text reads, "If you want to get this close to nature, there's really only one way to do it. Drive a legendary Jeep 4x4. For more information, call 1-800-925-JEEP or visit http://www.jeepunpaved.com on the Internet".

I think this ad is self explanatory. It uses the photo of elephant's backside to grab your attention and the meaning of the text is perfectly clear ... only a JEEP vehicle can get you this close. The ad might have worked with close-up shots of other animals but the elephant has the most eye appeal.

Magazine Ad - Jell-O
Full Page ad for Jell-O brand dessert ran in 1954.

Text says." When I'm eating Jell-O
I wish I were an elephant
... because than I could eat my favorite dessert by the trunkful:
( And Jell-O's so smooth and light, I'd never feel too full ! )"

Magazine Ad - Ethyl® Corp
Ethyl Corporation's 1950 ad page in LIFE magazine used elephants as symbols. One of Ethyl's points had to do with controlling the enormous power of gasoline much as the mahout and circus performer are seen controlling the enormous elephants.

Magazine Ad - Memory Service
This small ad for Never Forget Memory Service appeared on the bottom left of classifieds page (bordered in red for this page) in Inc. Magazine, February 1990. Not a surprise they would use an elephant to catch the eye and mimic their product.

Magazine Ad - PayDay Candy Bars
Full Page Full Color magazine ad for PayDay candy bar ran in Motor Trend, March 1999.

Headline:
"Can't Get Enough Peanuts?
(PayDay image)
Sweet Caramel. Tons Of Salty Peanuts."

Elephant has crossed out $2.00 toll and painted PAYDAY on toll booth. We know the elephant did it because there is yellow paint on her trunk. Note the elephant's foot resting on counter; toll taker's official cap on head.

Really entertaining ad uses absurdity at several levels coupled with known affinity of elephants for peanuts.
Sport Magazine May or June 2000 - issue uncertain.
Full page for PayDay candy bar.
The elephant is using an acetylene cutting torch to break into truck and get PayDay candy.

© 1998 Hershey Foods Corp

Magazine Ad - Northwest Airlines
Northwest Airlines ran a full page ad in some business magazine whose name and date are not on our archive page.

The ad copy consists of tips for business travelers who may go to Thailand and a pitch for the enhanced services offered by Northwest. Elephants are symbolic of Thailand besides being very appealing. The ad maximizes using the elephants by giving the lead paragraph over to the subject of elephants in Thai culture.

The smallish headline reads, "In Bangkok, good things come in enormous packages". Elephants are enormous, but not the baby shown tailed up to its mom who is mostly off the page.

Clever ad, well done. The elephant images appear to be either original art or digitally manipulated photos. No credit line for artist appears on page. ©1990 Northwest Airlines, Inc.

Magazine Ad - Sharp
Cooking Light magazine issue November 2000 had this full page ad for Sharp microwave ovens.

The upper image is of a goldfish bowl with an elephant inside. Above the image the text reads "The concept behind our Platinum Collection microwaves:"
Next line: "Big on the inside, small on the outside."

The message is clear. © Sharp Electronics Corp

Magazine Ad - Viceroy Cigarettes
Maybe you can figure out what the headline in this 1969 ad has to do with the product. I can't. They are using an elephant with a "string" around its trunk so it won't forget. Forget what?

Magazine Ad - Three Feathers Whiskey
1946 ad page features elephant balancing three cocktails pyramid on trunk over Three Feathers brand logo and so forth. The small headline reads, "Feature Attraction", meaning their product but obviously playing to the unusual performance by a pachyderm.

Newspaper Ad - Movie Jumanji
2 column by 5 inch display ad for motion picture "Jumanji" starring Robin Williams.

The ad clearly features a large elephant crushing an automobile. There is a scene of that event in the movie but the entire elephant scene lasts only a few minutes. The elephant is not central to the story in any way. Obviously, the elephant was chosen for the ad because of the dramatic impact an imposing figure like an elephant brings to the scene.

The scene is so effective it has been used by at least two magazines in articles about computer aided special effects production. Digital wizardry enabled the scene in question. Ad ran in Sarasota Herald-Tribune, 02-26-1996 newspaper is copyrighted.






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